By Robert Fitzgerald, Chris Rowley

Hong Kong faces a brand new, or renewed, set of demanding situations associated with the up-grading of human assets, shifts in commercial constitution, and rising industry calls for. The individuals research and examine elements of commercial and administration in Hong Kong.

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Managed in Hong Kong: Adaptive Systems, Entrepreneurship and Human Resources

Hong Kong faces a brand new, or renewed, set of demanding situations associated with the up-grading of human assets, shifts in business constitution, and rising marketplace calls for. The individuals study and examine facets of commercial and administration in Hong Kong.

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L. ', Far Eastern Economic Review, Vol. XLVII, p. 66. Florida, R. and Kenney, M. (1990) 'Why Silicon Valley Won't Save Us', California Management Review, Vol. 33, Fall, pp. 68-88. Hayek, F. (1945) 'The Use of Knowledge in Society', American Economic Review, Vol. 519-30. Hofstede, G. H. (1988) 'The Confucius Connection: from Cultural Roots to Economic Growth', Organizational Dynamics, Vol. 16, pp. 5-21. Hollows, J. (1995), 'Managing Human Resources in the Chinese Context: the Experience of a Major Multinational', in H.

The territory returned to its historical role as an entrepot, with manufacturing accounting for less than 13 per cent of GDP and 20 per cent of employment. This story of 'positive deindustrialization' illustrates both how well Hong Kong has been treated by events in China, and how well its system of adaptation has responded to the circumstances of time and place. The opening of the Chinese economy has given Hong Kong manufacturing firms a 'breathing space' in which the existing adaptive mechanisms have proved sufficient to the task and no major new organizational capabilities were required.

In that sector economies of scale and scope are very significant, assets are highly specialized, often location specific, and efficient adaptation needs to take the coordinated form, requiring the development of much larger firms with hierarchical management structures. As Chinese culture tends to be wary and inhibitive of such structures this sector was dominated by the colonial hongs or British firms with management cultures far removed from those of the local enterprises. In the period from 1953 until around 1980, the Hong Kong economy may be described as one in which high performance was achieved through a 'binary' adaptive system made up of two very distinct parts, containing two very different types of organization.

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